George Orwell’s 1984

I participated in 2 swaps this month that ended up having me read George Orwell’s 1984. The first was called “Pick My Next Read” and the second was one where the genre changes each month. This month? Dystopias.

Originally, I was going to read The Testing by Joelle Charbonneau for the dystopia swap. However, it got close to the send by date, and I hadn’t even cracked the cover of it. I’d been tasked with reading a combo novel of Animal Farm & 1984 for the other swap, and so I am going to end up using 1984 for both. Sorry for being lazy.

Ultimatey, I can sum up my review of 1984 (and to a lesser extent, Animal Farm) this way: Continue reading

Mozzie is Lazy

20140812_223622Mozzie loves soft things. The softer, the better. He kneads on stuff, and then drools buckets. He will drool big enough puddles that if you sit in them, they will soak through your jeans, to your skin.

So living with us, he’s in soft thing heaven. Pet and I are fond of soft things too, and almost all of our blankets are soft, fuzzy ones.  Mozzie has no shortage of blankets to drool on.

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July Reading Log

July saw me chewing through seven books, which is more than average. One was a non fiction, 2 were books I had been waiting for, and two were even out of my comfort zone! That being said, only two were books I really, really liked.

 

Silver Shadows – Richelle Mead

Silver Shadows is the fifth book in the Bloodlines series, a spinoff of the wildly successful Vampire Academy series. Personally, I like Bloodlines far better than I like the VA series. Sydney, the main character, is far more intelligent and quick thinking than Rose, who was the lead for the VA series.

In this book, Sydney has been sent to re-education by the Alchemists, who discovered she’s in love with Adrian, a Moroi vampire. After spending who knows how long in solitary confinement, in the dark, Sydney figures her best chance of getting ahold of Adrian in dreams is to pretend to go along with the Alchemist’s “re-education” tactics. When the book isn’t being told from Sydney’s perspective, we’re getting Adrian’s, and his views from the outside as he struggles to free Sydney and figure out his own life.

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